Home
Subject list

Title 1

Next     Prev
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

258 Sep 14
Thascius Caecilius Cyprian (b.~200), Christian writer and Bishop of Carthage (248), died as a martyr in Carthage.
Links: Carthage     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1321 Sep 14
Dante Alighieri, author of the "Divine Comedy," died of malaria just hours after finishing writing "Paradiso." The poem was completed in Italian rather than Latin. It helped make Italian the dominant linguistic force in European literature for the next few centuries. In 2006 Barbara Reynolds authored “Dante: The Poet, the Political Thinker, the Man.”
Links: Italy, Poet, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1638 Sep 14
John Harvard (B.1607), a Massachusetts Puritan minister died. On his deathbed he bequeathed half his estate to Harvard College.
Links: USA, Massachusetts, Education     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1646 Sep 14
Robert Devereux (b.1591), 3rd earl of Essex, died.
Links: Britain     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1716 Sep 14
The 1st lighthouse in the US was lit in Boston Harbor. It was blown up by the British in 1776 and was replaced in 1783.
Links: USA, Massachusetts     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1737 Sep 14
Johann Michael Haydn (d.1806), composer and younger brother of Franz Jo-seph, was born in Austria.
Links: Austria     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1743 Sep 14
Nicolas Lancret, French artist, died. He was a brilliant depicter of light comedy which reflected the tastes and manners of French society under the regent Orleans. His work included “Study of a Woman Seated on the Ground” and “Study of a Man.”
Links: Artist, France     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1759 Sep 14
Louis Joseph de Montcalm-Grozon, Marquis de Montcalm (b.1712) and chief of French forces, died at age 47 on the Plains of Abraham in Canada.
Links: Canada     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1786 Sep 14
Two French ships appeared off the coast of Monterey, the first foreign vessels to visit Spain's California colonies. Aboard was a party of eminent scientists, navigators, cartographers, illustrators, and physicians. For the next ten days Jean Francois de La Pérouse, the commander of this expedition, took detailed notes on the life and character of the area. Perouse’s notes were later published under the title “Life in a California Mission: Monterey in 1786: The Journals of Jean Francois De LA Perouse.”
Links: France, California, Explorer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1812 Sep 14
The Russian army left Moscow. Napoleon's invasion of Russia reached its climax as his Grande Armee entered Moscow, only to find the enemy capital deserted and burning, set afire by the few Russians who remained. The fires were extinguished by Sep 19.
Links: Russia, France     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1814 Sep 14
In the dawn light Francis Scott Key saw that the American flag still waved over Fort McHenry in Maryland during the War of 1812. He looked on from the deck of a boat on the Patasco River nine miles away and wrote “The Star Spangled Banner.” The lyrics were alter adopted to the British tune "To Anacreon in Heaven,” which had also served as Irish drinking song and a number of other songs. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was officially recognized as the national anthem in 1931. The seldom sung third verse says: “No refuge could save the hireling and slave from the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave.” The 40 feet long flag had been made by Baltimore widow Mary Young Pickersgill and her 13-year-old daughter just a month before the attack. In 1907 the flag was donated to the Smithsonian.
Links: Britain, USA, Maryland     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1836 Sep 14
Aaron Burr, the 3rd US Vice President, died. He had served as vice-president under Thomas Jefferson. Burr is alleged to have fathered a black illegitimate son named John Pierre Burr. In 1999 Roger W. Kennedy authored "Burr, Hamilton and Jefferson: A Study in Character." In 2007 Nancy Isenberg authored “Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr.”
Links: USA, Black History, Biography, JeffersonT     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1849 Sep 14
La Meuse, the first ship to sail from France to California, arrived in San Francisco with 41 all male passengers.
Links: USA, France, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1852 Sep 14
Augustus Pugin (b.1812), English Gothic architect and designer, died. He had just this year helped oversee the completion of the new Palace of Westminster and sketched a design for the clock tower shortly before his death. In 2007 Rosemary Hill authored “God’s Architect: Pugin and the Building of Romantic Britain.
Links: Britain, Architect, Biography     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1862 Sep 14
In San Francisco some 3,000 people packed into Platt’s Music Hall at Bush and Montgomery to hear Unitarian minister Starr King (1824-1864) speak on behalf of the Sanitary Commission, a forerunner of the Red Cross. His speech inspired businessmen to raise money and within 5 days $100,000 was raised. In one year California raised some $500,000.
Links: USA, SF, Civil War (US)     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1874 Sep 14
In Louisiana the Battle of Liberty Place was an attempted insurrection by the Crescent City White League against the legal Reconstruction state government in New Orleans.
Links: USA, Louisiana     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1876 Sep 14
Henry Morton Stanley's expedition left Rwanda.
Links: CongoDRC     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1882 Sep 14
British General Wolseley (d.1913) reached Cairo.
Links: Egypt     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1886 Sep 14
Jan Garrique Masaryk (d.1948), Czech statesman, was born.
Links: Czechoslovakia     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1893 Sep 14
In Virginia the Randolph-Macon Women’s College opened under Pres. William Waugh Smith. The first session began with 36 boarding students and 12 professors.
Links: USA, Virginia, Women, Education     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.
1905 Sep 14
Pierre de Brazza (b.1852), Franco-Italian explorer, died and was buried in Algeria. He was born in Italy and later naturalized French. Brazza single-handedly opened up for France entry along the right bank of the Congo that eventually led to French colonies in West Africa. In 2006 his remains were exhumed and moved to a mausoleum in Brazzaville, capital of the Republic of Congo.
Links: Algeria, Italy, France, Congo Rep., Explorer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1909 Sep 14
The Tootsie Roll trade-mark was registered. The application by NYC candy makers Hirschfeld and Stern & Saalberg stated that “Tootsie” had been used in association with the candy since September 1908. Leo Hirshfield had invented Bromangelon Jelly Powder around 1895.
Links: USA, NYC, Food     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1913 Sep 14
The Lincoln Highway Association announced the route of the Lincoln Highway. Its leaders, particularly Henry Joy, President of the Packard Motor Car Company, decided on as straight a route as possible and that decision dictated the course. That initial line was 3,389 miles long. Less than half of it, 1,598 miles, was improved. (Eventually, as segments of the route were improved, the length shrunk to about 3,140 miles).
Links: USA, Cars     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1933 Sep 14
Zoe Caldwell, actress (Prime of Miss Jean Brodie), was born in Australia. In 2001 Caldwell authored “I Will Be Cleopatra: An Actress’s Journey.”
Links: Australia     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1936 Sep 14
Irving G. Thalberg (37), film producer and husband to actress Norma Shearer (d.1983), died of pneumonia. In 1937 Hollywood established the Thalberg Memorial Award people whose work reflected a "consistently high quality." In 2009 Mark A. Viera authored “Irving Thalberg: Boy Wonder to Producer Prince.”
Links: USA, Biology, Film     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1937 Sep 14
TG Masaryk (b.1886), the first president of Czechoslovakia, died in Bohemia.
Links: Czechoslovakia     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1944 Sep 14
A Category 3 hurricane, the Great Atlantic Hurricane, struck eastern New England. Winds hit 109 MPH in Connecticut and 46 people were killed on land and caused $100 million in damage. The storm sank 5 ships killing 344 people.
Links: USA, Connecticut, WeatherUS, Hurricane     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1944 Sep 14
The submarine USS Pampanito picked up 73 allied prisoners left adrift following the Sep 12 submarine attack on a Japanese convoy that included the transport ship Rakuyo Maru.
Links: Australia, Britain, USA, Japan, Ship, Submarine, WWII     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1955 Sep 14
Marine Capt. Richard McCutchen became the 1st contestant to win the TV quiz “$64,000 Question.”
Links: TV     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1956 Sep 14
Egypt assumed complete control over the operation of the Suez Canal.
Links: Egypt     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1960 Sep 14
A Congo coup led by Col. Mobutu overthrew PM Patrice Lumumba.
Links: CongoDRC     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1960 Sep 14
Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela formed OPEC. Fuad Rouhani (1907-2004) of Iran served as its 1st secretary-general. In 1964 he was succeeded by Abdul Rahman Bazzaz of Iraq.
Links: Iraq, Venezuela, Oil, Iran, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, OPEC     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1960 Sep 14
REITs were created when President Eisenhower signed into law the REIT Act title contained in the Cigar Excise Tax Extension of 1960. REITs were created by Congress in order to give all investors the opportunity to invest in large-scale, diversified portfolios of income-producing real estate.
Links: USA, EisenhowerD, Real Estate     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1961 Sep 14
SF vice squad stage an early morning raid at the Tay-Bush Inn, a restaurant at Bush and Taylor, and jailed 103 people. All but 14 were men accused of dancing together and kissing. Of 242 patrons 139 escaped. Police arrested 103 of an estimated 242 patrons in the “biggest action of its kind.” Charges against all but 2 of those arrested were later dropped (1st source says August 14).
Links: USA, Gays, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1964 Sep 14
Vasily Grossman (b.1905), Ukraine-born journalist and writer, died, His work included the novel “Life and Fate,” a chronicle of the Battle of Stalingrad, which wasn’t published until 1980.
Links: Russia, Ukraine, Writer, USSR     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1964 Sep 14
California’s State Health Advisory Board approved a change in health regulations that enables fathers to be present during the birth of their children.
Links: USA, California, Medical     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1965 Sep 14
The 4th meeting of 2nd Vatican council opened.
Links: Vatican     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1965 Sep 14
The situation comedy "My Mother the Car" premiered on NBC-TV.
Links: USA, TV, Cars     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1965 Sep 14
Dmitry Medvedev was born in Leningrad. In 2008 with the backing of Vladimir Putin, he became prime minister of Russia.
Links: Russia, USSR     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1965 Sep 14
Vasily Grossman (b.1964, Soviet writer, died in Moscow. In 1961 his novel “Life and Fate,” a book about Nazis and Soviets at war, was confiscated. A copy was smuggled to the US and published in English 1985. In 2011 the BBC dramatized the book on Radio 4.
Links: Russia, Writer, USSR, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.
1966 Sep 14
Operation Attleboro, designed as a training exercise for American troops in South Vietnam, became a month-long struggle against the Viet Cong.
Links: Vietnam     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1966 Sep 14
Tillie Edelstein (b.1898), actress and screenwriter, died. As Gertrude Berg, she created “The Goldbergs” (1929), a radio program that later became first television sitcom. In 2009 Aviva Kempner directed a documentary of Berg titled “Yoo-Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg.”
Links: USA, TV, Radio     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1967 Sep 14
The TV series “Ironside” began and continued to 1975. It featured Raymond Burr. Early episodes used the old Hall of Justice at 750 Kearney in San Francisco.
Links: USA, SF, TV     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1968 Sep 14
Al Frueh (b.1880), American caricature artist (New Yorker magazine), died.
Links: Artist, USA, Cartoons, Magazine     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1969 Sep 14
Males of Swiss canton Schaffhausen rejected female suffrage.
Links: Switzerland, Women     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1971 Sep 14
"Cannon" with William Conrad premiered on CBS-TV.
Links: USA, TV     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1972 Sep 14
The family drama series "The Waltons" premiered on CBS.
Links: USA, TV     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1973 Sep 14
Pres Nixon signed into law a measure lifting pro football's blackout.
Links: USA, Football, NixonR     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1975 Sep 14
Rembrandt's "Nightwatch" was slashed and damaged in Amsterdam.
Links: Artist, Netherlands     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1975 Sep 14
Pope Paul VI declared Mother Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton the first native-born American saint in the Roman Catholic Church.
Links: USA, Vatican     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1978 Sep 14
The Soviet Union suspended further flights of the supersonic TU 144.
Links: Russia, Aviation, USSR     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1979 Sep 14
Colombia signed an extradition treaty with the US, but Colombian leaders enacted legislation that nullified the pact. It became effective march 4, 1982.
Links: Colombia, USA     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1982 Sep 14
John C. Gardner (b.1933), US, writer (Life & Times of Chaucer High), was killed in a motorcycle accident. In 2004 Barry Silesky authored "John Gardner: Literary Outlaw."
Links: USA, Writer, Biography     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1982 Sep 14
Lebanon's president-elect, Bashir Gemayel, was killed by a bomb.
Links: Lebanon     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1982 Sep 14
Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly actress Grace Kelly, died at age 52 of injuries from a car crash the day before. Her daughter Stephanie survived the crash. Kelly rose to prominence in film with 1952's 'High Noon', and she worked with Alfred Hitchcock in several films including 'Rear Window'. Her movie career was a brief six years where she did win an Oscar for 'The Country Girl'. In 1956 she retired from film following her marriage to Prince Rainier of Monaco.
Links: Monaco, Filmstar     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1984 Sep 14
Richard Brautigan (49), writer, died from self-inflicted gunshot wound in Bolinas, Ca. His work included "Trout Fishing in America" (1967) and A Confederate General from Big Sur" (1964). In 1989 Keith Abbott authored the biography: "Downstream from Trout Fishing in America: A Memoir of Richard Brautigan." In 1999 Edna Webster published "The Edna Webster Collection of Undiscovered Writings." In 2004 Greg Keeler authored “Waltzing with the Captain: Remembering Richard Brautigan. In 2012 William Hjortsberg authored “Jubilee Hitchhiker: The Life and Times of Richard Brautigan.”
Links: USA, California, Writer, Biography     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1984 Sep 14
Janet Gaynor (77), the first actress to win an Academy Award (1929), died in San Francisco. She had never fully recovered from a car crash in 1982. Her 34 movies included “Seventh Heaven” and the first “A Star Is Born.”
Links: USA, SF, Film Star     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1984 Sep 14
In Georgia Taressa Stanley, a clerk at a Quickie convenience store in Warner Robbins, was killed during a robbery. Police soon arrested Timothy R. Johnson (22) and reportedly frightened him into pleading guilty. Georgia’s Supreme Court overturned Johnson’s conviction in 2006 and he was freed in 2013 after a new jury found him not guilty on all charges.
Links: Georgia(US), Murder, Robbery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1985 Sep 14
The situation comedy "The Golden Girls" premiered on NBC and continued to 1992. The show included Beatrice Arthur, Betty White, Rue McClanahan (d.1010 at 76) and Estelle Getty as 4 older women living together in Florida.
Links: USA, TV     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1985 Sep 14
Shiite Muslim kidnappers in Lebanon released the Rev. Benjamin Weir after holding him captive for 16 months.
Links: USA, Lebanon     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.

Next     Prev
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8



Go to top